Hustle Mindset

Terry Crews Went From Sweeping Floors And Taking Loans From NFL Teammates To An Estimated $25M Fortune

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With current food and gas prices at an all-time high, people are looking for ways to earn extra money and save where it counts. If there were ever a cultural figure that could show people extreme ways of saving a little coin, look no further than Julius from “Everybody Hates Chris,” played by veteran actor Terry Crews.

Crews portrayed a blue-collar worker, father, and husband constantly burdened by financial stress on-screen. While many of the character’s strategies were extreme, Crews’ real-life approach to budgeting and finance is a testament to his diverse financial talents, not too far removed from his 2000s-era character.

Terry Crews And His Uncanny NFL Journey

Terry Crews entered the entertainment industry on a nontraditional path. After some time in college, he was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in 1991. His professional football career was unstable, as he played for six different teams across five years, including the San Diego Chargers and Washington Redskins, as well as overseas in Germany. In a conversation with actor Dax Shepard on the “Armchair Expert” podcast, he noted that he lived in Wisconsin during his six-month practice stint with the Green Bay Packers, making a modest $150 per week.

Crews stated, “I would have made more money at McDonald’s. That’s the reality.”

CNBC reported that after Crews went back and forth with NFL teams to make money, he cultivated his artistic talents and began painting murals and portraits for his former teammates, charging around $5,000 for each piece.

While his NFL career was part of his initial plan, being an actor was always Crews’ goal as well.

“I told my wife when I met her, I said, ‘Look, first of all, I’m going to play in the NFL. And then, after we play in the NFL, we’re going to move to Hollywood. We’re going to make movies.’ And she was like, ‘OK!’ I meant every word,” Crews explained on “Money Talks” for CNBC Make It in 2018.

A Determination To Make It

As he transitioned into Hollywood, the now 55-year-old depended on his friend and former teammate Ken Harvey. He borrowed around 15 loans from Harvey to help sustain himself and his family after he retired from the NFL.

Harvey eventually stopped loaning Crews money, forcing him to face the reality that he needed a steady stream of income. Crews got a job sweeping a factory for $8 an hour, and suddenly, the light clicked for him.

“I just kept sweeping, kept doing it. I had $64 at the end of the day. I went, ‘Oh my God, I actually made this money on my own.’ I was never broke again,” Crews explained. “I never stopped working.”

Like his TV character Julius, Crews kept his hustling mindset going and eventually built a $25 million net worth.

Realizing his Hollywood dreams, Crews has appeared in several television shows and films, including hosting “America’s Got Talent” and starring in the movies “Deadpool 2” and “White Chicks.”

Terry Crews’ Diverse Portfolio

In addition to acting, Crews capitalized on his image and likeness by partnering with brands such as Shoe Carnival and Old Spice.

The husband and father of five also found himself behind the camera as the CEO and co-founder of Super Serious. The firm is a creative venture focused on providing entertainment through features, TV series, art, books, music, concerts, events, and original and branded content — USA Today reports.

And if anyone ever wondered about those outstanding loans he received at the start of his Hollywood career, he paid them off.

“He was already rich, and the loans were really minimal. But to me they were giant. Because he was a real friend to me. He really taught me a lesson,” Crews stated about paying off his debts.





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